Steroids for vestibular neuronitis in dogs

My kitten had the onset of this on Monday morning, vomitting, unable to walk and loss of balance, bobble head and flickering eyes. She’s gotten a lot better in the few days. Vet ran bloodwork and everything came back normal. Tuesday she came home and was fine, Wed she had an episode that lasted about an hour and a half. Thursday no episodes and this morning Friday she had one that lasted 5minutes. A little head bob and nystygmus with the eyes. I’m hopeful that this is clearing up as the symptoms were not as bad as they were on Monday morning. Vet gave her a steroid shot as well. She’s been eating, drinking and playing normally. I’m hoping that someone can tell me that she will be okay in a few days as she is my baby and I want to avoid a CT scan if possible.

Vestibular paroxysmia is believed to be caused by the neurovascular compression of the cochleovestibular nerve, as it occurs with other neurovascular compression syndromes (. trigeminal neuralgia). The irregular and unpredictable spells are the most disabling aspect of this condition, making some daily activities, like driving, extremely dangerous. In theory, given its pathophysiology, surgical treatment could be considered. Still, due to the substantial surgical risks involved, this approach is reserved for particular cases where pharmacological treatment is not effective or tolerated. Treatment with carbamazepine (Tegretol®) or oxcarbamazepine (Trileptal®), both anticonvulsants primarily used in the treatment of epilepsy, is usually not only effective in small dosages, but is also diagnostic. Vestibular depressants are not effective.

Steroids for vestibular neuronitis in dogs

steroids for vestibular neuronitis in dogs

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